Friday, October 2, 2015

How to Measure Over-draperies

How to Measure Over-draperies 
Length of draperies depends, like that of glass curtains, on the style of window treatment and the type of window you have. Very formal draperies call for a drape of 6 to 12 inches along the floor, whereas less formal draperies should just escape the floor. A word of caution: if you live in a sooty city where cleaning is a matter of constant vigilance, avoid the more formal draperies, which may act as dirt catchers, and remember that there is nothing elegant about a dirty drapery dragging along the floor. Also if you have very young children, this type of drapery is apt to prove a menace. Draperies may also be sill length, particularly in recessed windows, or may come to the bottom of the window apron. In measuring the length make the following allowances: 1 inch for the rod; 2 or 3 inches for the heading or stiffened pinch-pleated top, if you are not counting on a swag or valance; 3 inches for the top hem to turn under the linings or buckram; 3/4 inches for the bottom hem, or if you plan to add trim, % inch for the bottom hem.

The average drapery fabric usually comes 36 and 50 inches wide, and you will not usually want to split this width. Use one width for each side of the average window. The drapery should conceal the frame of the window. The width is always at least twice the completed width to allow for pleats and drapery effects.

How to Measure Over-draperies 
If you are using the curtain-wall idea with the draperies going clear across the room, you will want to measure the entire length of the wall, and your height should be from just below the ceiling moulding.

With figured fabrics it is necessary to allow for repeats of patterns. These must be counted and arranged to come exactly opposite one another on the same line for every piece of drapery in the room. This may require about 20 inches of additional material, according to the size of the design.

Measuring Linings

Linings are 4 to 5 inches narrower than draperies, and 6 inches shorter. The lining is attached below the top hem. If you plan an interlining buy this 3 to 6 inches shorter than the lining. The lining should come out the exact measurement of the draperies when completed.

Measuring for Valances

When you are planning your windows as a unit, you will plan to buy your valance or swag material at the same time as your curtain or drapery fabric, especially if you are going to use the same material.

How to Measure Over-draperies 
In figuring how much yardage to get for a valance, plan on a depth of at least 12 inches for a shirred valance or one with a flounce. To this add 2 inches for the bottom hem, plus 2 inches for the turn around the rod, plus 2 inches for the heading above the rod. If you are using a shaped valance, plan on about 15 inches of depth, although there are no hard and fast rules on this, as the length of your window and your wall should be taken into consideration. But as the valance will tend to reduce the light afforded by the window and will make the window seem smaller, bear in mind the ruling that the valance should not take up more than one-eighth of your curtain length.

It is generally agreed that the fuller a pleated valance looks the more attractive it is, so to have a starchy, dainty valance measure twice double your width; in fact for a full pleat or a box pleat try 2% to 3 times the width.

Measuring for a swag is easy if you follow this formula: take the length of your window from top frame to floor, add the width of the window, and the length of the other side from top of frame to window sill.

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Valances, Cornices, Swags (Valances)


Valances, Cornices, Swags (Valances)
Stiffened valances seem to go in and out of style. Just a few years ago a formal valance was considered very old-fashioned, but today with increasing use of elaborate period decor, the more formal valances are good once more. This also holds for the draped valance with jabots, a treatment most adaptable to formal rooms using satins, taffetas, and other rich fabrics.

A valance board is very easily constructed by mounting a shelf about 3/8 % inch thick and four inches wide on a 4 inch metal corner, which is fastened to the wall with screws or toggle bolts.

To make a stiff valance, cut a pattern the width of your window from a piece of stiff brown paper or muslin. Make it as deep as you think correct, remembering that deep valances cut down the appearance of height and may seem overwhelming in a small room. The usual depth is from one-sixth to one-eight the length of your draperies.

Fold at the center to make the curve symmetrical; if you want a curved valance, make the curve deeper at the center and cut a graceful swirl. With your paper pattern as a guide cut your buckram or canvas stiffening the same size and shape. Cut the side piece the width of the side of your shelf, or valance board. Bind the raw edges of the buckram so they won't pierce the fabric of the covering later. Place this buckram pattern on your fabric and cut around it, leaving about an inch-wide border all around, that you will later turn over. You can then cut a matching piece of cotton padding, although this is optional, and a matching piece of sateen lining, the size of your buckram pattern. Lay all together, placing the fabric right side up, the lining right side down, and the stiffening on top. Stitch along the lower edge, and turn so that the stiffening lies in between. Overcast the top and ends, tucking in the raw edges as you sew.

Valances, Cornices, Swags (Valances)
A welting along the edge of a shaped valance increases the look of good tailoring. Baste the welting between the fabric and the lining before machine stitching all the layers together. The welting should be turned so the round edge is inside and all the raw edges outside, in order to have it fall correctly when it is turned right side out. Another finish for this type of valance is a moss fringe, applied along the front four edges to give a boxy look.

Sew a strip of twill tape across the back of the lining with strong thread, and then use this tape to tack the valance to the valance board with wood snappers or thumb tacks.

You can use a rod instead o a valance board for a softer effect, using a plain rod or a double rod on which your curtains hang, too. In this case you leave a slot or opening for the rod to pass through, or provide a casing with heading as for a curtain. For a gathered or shirred valance of this type make the valance about twice the length needed for the width of the window. Double the depth needed, and add a seam allowance. Crease the material down the center and fold on the crease lengthwise, turning the right sides together. Sew one side and the top, leaving an opening large enough for your rod to pass through at each side, near the top. Turn inside out, so that the fabric is now on the right side on both front and back, and sew the remaining side. Then seam a casing for the rod. When adjusted to the rod this should result in a generously shirred valance, with heading.

Ruffled valances may hang from a rod in much the same manner. If you wish to have two or three rows of ruffles, apply them to a plain foundation of muslin or sateen, made in the same manner as a plain valance.

Valances, Cornices, Swags (Valances)
The pleated valance is made in the same way as a regular plain valance, except that you must allow at least a full length more of material for the width. Take the width of your valance and allow another full length for pleating. Allow sufficient fabric at each end for a seam and for the sides. That is, if your valance is to be 36 inches, your fabric should be 72 inches wide. From that width, subtract the width of each side (let us say they are each 3 inches deep). This leaves 66 inches for pleating, and means that 30 inches of pleating can be used in the pleats. It is clear that the length of the fabric allowed for each pleat must be twice what you wish the pleat to be. If in our assumed valance we wish to have 10 pleats, by dividing 10 into 30, we have 3 inches to use in each pleat, and each pleat can be one-half of 3 inches deep, or 1% inches.

Next divide the numbered pleats into the width of the valance. This will give us the distance between each pleat In our valance this would mean dividing 36 by 10, or 3%th inches between pleats. The first and last pleats will be at the corners of the valance. After pinning the first pleat at top and bottom, the center of the next pleat will be equal to one-half the width of the pleat plus the distance we have already found necessary to leave between pleats.

Fold the pleats in on the pin marks, pressing them as you fold them. Then stitch them so that the folded edges facing one another are caught firmly together, and to reinforce this make two rows of stitching across the back of the entire valance. Hooks for attaching this type of valance to a cornice board can be sewn into the stitching reinforcing the pleats. 

Sunday, July 26, 2015

Curtains and Draperies Decorating Ideas

We have been concerned with the basic problems of curtain and drapery making. But you may want to use your imagination, and window treatments lend themselves to the fanciful touch.

Decorating your shades may prove amusing. Use regular canvas paint, available at art-material stores, and trace or free hand whatever gay design you like, whether it is a sophisticated abstraction or a quaint Pennsylvania Dutch or peasant motif. You can paint your entire shade to match or contrast with your walls or fabrics. If your draperies have a pattern, trace the pattern on the shade. With a broad window treat the shade as a mural, and paint a rural scene or seascape, thus enlarging the horizons of your room. Or, if you have found a stunning fabric that is too expensive for draperies, use it for shades that you make yourself.

Take your old shade as a guide, adding 2 inches for a hem and 2 for tacking the shade to the roller at the top. Hem the sides with a narrow hem. Use your old shade rod for your hand-made shade, binding it in with firm stitches.

Although bamboo blinds are very handsome in their natural state, if you have an elegant room, with metallic fabrics, echo the glint of the gold or silver with metallic paint, or better still with gold or silver leaf, brushed or streaked, very thinly, on your blinds. The effect seen from the outside is entrancingly rich. Another idea is to paint your blinds the color of your room. This also applies to the wider porch or slat type of blind which may be used on a large picture window.

When hanging bamboo blinds simply use large hooks at either end of the window to hold the top bamboo pole. Use cleats, like those used on sailboats, to fasten the rope that pulls them up. Attach these on the inside of the blind, and they will not be seen. Venetian blinds, now available in aluminum or galvanized steel, won't rust, sag, warp or break. They last for years.

In a small room with a high ceiling, you might continue your valance all the way round three walls, directly under the ceiling. This will help to focus attention on the window, and will seem to expand the walls.

If you have television, remember that plain white spaces make it easier to concentrate on the screen. Try a three-quarter length white opaque glass curtain, hung from a bold black or brass pole, and used with draperies that can be drawn aside when your set is in use.

The very newest idea in window styling is that of the fabric vertical blind, for average windows or for large picture windows and window walls. They are custom-made to varying designs by a handful of companies, but the hardware is not as yet available for making these blinds yourself. They are fairly reasonably priced in a wide range of modern bold and pastel colors, come in fabrics such as corded acetate faille, and can be drawn back from the window by one control, and set at angles by another. They are proving a handsome addition to sun-shielding devices for large glass areas.

Finally, use your imagination when it comes to tying in your draperies with your other fabrics. Use the same patterns or colors for portieres, slipcovers, spreads, lampshades. Ensembles, particularly for the bedroom, are more popular than ever. 

Monday, June 15, 2015

Life-Saving Hints for Curtains and Draperies

Life-Saving Hints for Curtains and Draperies
Life-Saving Hints for Curtains and Draperies 
A few precautions in storing, cleaning and laundering your curtains and draperies will add to their attractiveness and prolong their usefulness.

Curtains may be kept up and hung in cotton bags during the summer, which is an effective way of keeping them clean when windows are open, or when the family is away on vacation, or storage space and help are limited.

If the unwashable draperies are taken down, they should be brushed, aired and packed away in large boxes. Never pack curtains tightly, since it is hard to get the creases out again. Pile fabrics should be sent to the cleaner to be steamed if they are badly crushed.
With sheers that you wish to put away for the summer, wash them first, and then in the fall dampen and iron them before putting up.

When laundering glass curtains, let the tucks out first so that you can correct the length afterward, using your shrinkage allowance if you have to, and leaving a smaller tuck than the original one for the next tubbing.

Instead of attempting to shake out dust, rinse the curtains in a preliminary tubful of clear, lukewarm water. You will discover that you have loosened black dirt too, especially if you live in the city. For delicate materials use lots of suds to cushion the material, more than you would with apparel. If yours is a sturdy fabric, it can be washed in a machine. Use a mild soap. Squeeze the water out, don't rinse, and hang the curtains straight. If the fabric is net or lace and is not shrinkproof, you will need to use a stretcher. With many shrinkable materials, no matter what pre- cautions you take you will have shrinking, and the only course remaining will be to add a new heading that is, of course, unless you have included plenty of room in your shrinkage allowance. A little starch used with most glass fabrics will help to make them look crisp after washing. Ruffles particularly need stiffening for attractive starchiness.

Life-Saving Hints for Curtains and Draperies
Life-Saving Hints for Curtains and Draperies 
With delicate fabrics and colors, rolling in a towel after washing will help to preserve both the color and the fabric.

Color-fast heavy fabrics may be laundered, if care is exercised. Curtains and draperies may be dyed or tinted each season, as you will find they do not keep their color.

Iron curtains lengthwise with a warm iron, stretching them evenly, and when you are through hang them immediately, or lay them on a bed as, again, creases are hard to take out. Sometimes ironing causes curtains to hang unevenly and there is not much you can do about this. Automatic ironers do a better job of ironing, since the pressure is even.

Curtains and draperies that are faded, soiled or sun- burned irremediably at the bottom may be turned upside down, and the damaged part can be covered with cornice or valance, or carefully pleated so that it does not show.

Luckily, curtains and draperies that are somewhat worn always look much better once they are hung than they do in our hands. And trimmings and ruffles over worn edges will word wonders. Also panels may be reversed quite easily, with the right-hand side changed to the left, so that the outside edge which is worn or faded can be next to the trim and tucked under as much as possible, the other edge which was formerly protected by the trim now appearing quite fresh and unfaded. 

Friday, June 5, 2015

How to Improve the Interior Design of your Bedroom

bedroom designs
How to Improve the Interior Design of your Bedroom
There is no doubt that the bedroom is the most comfortable room of your house. It is private and designed for providing you the maximum amount of comfort. Apart from a warm bed, a bedroom also has furnishings like night stand, dresser and closet. Many bedrooms also have an attached bathroom whereas some others have a small balcony connected to it. If the interior décor of your bedroom is beautiful, then you would have a great time relaxing there. A bedroom is your calm sanctuary. You must make it the perfect place by enhancing the interior décor. Here are some methods by which you can do it:
1- Choosing the accurate bed for your bedroom:
accurate bed for your bedroom
This is the most important thing. Choosing a huge bed can make your bedroom look crowded if your room is quite small. If the room is spacious, then choosing a small bed can make it look inelegant. You have to choose the right bed, keeping in mind the size of your room. You must also choose a nice mattress.
2. Selecting some delightful colors:
delightful colors for your bedroom
In general, warm colors, pastel colors, neutral colors and earth colors go well for a bedroom. You can use these colors in your ceilings, walls and furniture. Extreme bright colors must be avoided as it can cause difficulty in sleeping. Soothing colors would keep you calm and peaceful in your bedroom.
3. Selecting a good flooring material:
good flooring material for bedroom
If you choose cold flooring such as ceramic tiles, granite or marble, your floor will remain cold most of the time. So, it is better to choose laminated flooring or wood flooring. In case you have chosen cold flooring, use a warm carpet near your bed.
4. Choosing a beautiful wall décor:
beautiful wall décor for bedroom
You can choose beautiful wallpaper, portraits painted by artists or pictures of your family for your wall décor. Matching the wall color with your wall décor can make your bedroom look aesthetically beautiful.
5. Selecting the perfect curtains:
perfect curtains for bedroom
Pick dark curtains for your bedroom only if you have a light colored wall. You can also sleep comfortably during the day if you have chosen dark curtains. However, if your wall color is bright, then go for light colored curtains.
Apart from these 5 tips that can help you to enhance the décor of your bedroom, you should also use a lampshade for perfect lighting and make sure that your bedroom has good ventilation. If the interior design is made perfectly, then you can have a great relaxing ambiance in your bedroom. So, make it a great place today!

Sunday, May 24, 2015

How to Achieve a Modern Interior Design

There is some debate on where Modern Interior Design originated, but credit is generally given to a group of European designers and architects that started the German Bauhaus School of Design back in the early 1900’s – using the Bauhaus philosophy that “form should be combined with function” in interior design. This resulted in a change in the industry’s use of designing materials, as it introduced glass and metals to be incorporated into household furnishings and other elements of design.

With Your Furnishings: The furnishings for your living area will incorporate clean, sleek lines that reflect a delicate balance of simplicity and comfort while incorporating elements of metal, chrome or glass that results in an overall slimmer silhouette. Many say it would be the exact opposite of a Traditional Interior Design, which in contrast incorporates bulky furniture and wood elements. Keep in mind, the use of the “form and function” method is prominent with a Modern Design – so the placement of the furniture is just as important as the type or style of the furniture.

With Your Walls and Color Scheme: When incorporating your color scheme you will discover there is a certain “coolness” that needs to be achieved to reflect the feel of the Modern Interior. Toned down colors add to the effect when using tone on tone or white for paint choices. Inspiration is pulled from the sleek, metal lines of the furnishings to create a soothing backdrop which adds to the simplicity and aura that a Modern Design Style encompasses.

With Your Fabrics: Texture will play a role as it will offset the rather sleek lines of your furnishing elements. Keeping the colors of the fabrics neutral will add to the cohesiveness of the room, but the texture will be what makes the room resonate with warmth. By using fabric drapes for your Window Treatments, you will pull in softness and add comfort – but choosing to go with blinds will also be complimentary to the overall simplistic theme of the design. Both options will work well and will depend on the overall function you require.

With Your Accessories: Many Interior Design themes have a minimalistic approach, the Modern Interior Design style is no different as its basic platform is “less is more”. Choose understated accessories that blend rather than demand attention – unless it is the focal point of the room. The use of metal and glass are prominent in accessorizing, as well as framed art or other wall hangings. Remember to emphasis clean lines and “de-clutter”.

Monday, May 18, 2015

Curtains Design for the Living Room

Curtains Design for the Living Room
Curtains Design for the Living Room
In our article we will see curtains and shutters combined in the same living room. This is so the sunlight can be managed from the predominant light source. The other window can stay “undressed” except for the curtain at the side which can be drawn at night. This way a view can be seen during the day through the window, and the harsh light through the other can be negated. A patterned fabric has been selected, the background color is the same as the wall color which allows them to sit quietly in the corner and blend, add some pattern to the simple design and decoration of the room, but not overwhelm.

Curtains Design for the Living Room
Curtains Design for the Living Room
Simple cream curtains in this living room abruptly stop the boldness of the red color of the walls. The room is warm and cozy, then bang! The cream curtains frame the window for you to look at the view. A roller blind has been used to block the sun when required with a decorative scalloped lower edge.

Curtains Design for the Living Room
Curtains Design for the Living Room
The curtain design in this living room is one of the focal points of the room. They are used to frame the window and the view. They are held back with hold backs keeping the fabric is a particular manner to permanently frame the window. The fabric is darker than the walls so you are naturally drawn to it and it sets a formal tone to the room. The heading is very ornate, and coordinates with the quality and style of the furniture and accessories of the living room.

Curtains Design for the Living Room
Curtains Design for the Living Room
A rouched valance with tails provides a formal curtain for this living room. The curtains are allowed to hang quite fully and held back at a low point with cord tie backs. The use of sheers and such a full drape of fabric blocks the view out the window and allows you to focus on the living room and the detail of the ceiling and the chandelier.