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Saturday, December 20, 2014

Decoration and Curtains Styling

Decoration and Curtains Styling
Decoration and Curtains Styling
Your decorative scheme is bound to influence your choice of fabric and the way you drape your windows.

Today it becomes increasingly difficult to label a room as Modern, Provincial, Directoire, or anything else. Modern rooms, no matter what the period is, have in common a smoothness and directness that separates them sharply from the cluttered rooms of other periods. Modern colors give them a contemporary feeling, no matter what the source of design. Some of the loveliest rooms combine the best in furniture and accessories from more than one period. You too, in all probability, have not felt that it was necessary to stick slavishly to any one period or style. It is much more likely that your home has taken its cue from the part of the country in which you live, whether you live in a city apartment or country house, and from your family's tastes and needs.

Nevertheless your window styling can pick up whatever style idea is dominant in your home, and in each room. Let's take the living room first.

Suppose you have a modern room. Limitless pos-sibilities emerge as to pattern or fabric and color, but in draping you are more or less confined to straight hanging draperies and glass curtains. You will want to avoid ruffles, shillings, festoons, and fancy tiebacks. If you have Chinese modern furniture, for example, glass curtains of raw silk shantung and draperies of solid-color damask with a weave that brings lines that resemble bamboo to the surface are possibilities. Or if you live in the Southwest, or in the country, and have a Modern room in which natural colors and textures predominate (such as exposed stone walls, great fireplaces, rush matting, bamboo blinds) you will want one o the modern hand-blocked or screen painted fabrics, perhaps in a Peruvian, Mayan, Guatamalan, or some other primitive print in one color against a natural ground. If your room is a more sophisticated kind of Modern, as in a city apartment, you may want one of the exciting abstract Modern designs. When tiebacks are necessary, use chunky pieces of brass, clear plastic, or simple wood, and avoid anything gadgety or fussy. In Modern fabric patterns, look for something simple that is, at the same time, not obvious a pattern that, because the artist has been clever, does not seem too repetitive.

Modern in feeling, but at quite the other end of the scale, is the classic style, in which the patterns suggest Grecian urns, classical columns, and figures. This style calls for delicately-draped hangings, swags, or festoons, falling in soft folds down the sides and some- times lying along the floor. They can be created in sheer materials and in richer brocades and hammered failles.

Decoration and Curtains Styling
Decoration and Curtains Styling
If your room is Provincial, ruffles are very good, of course, and they can be deep, wide and plentiful. Sash glass curtains on a brass rod are attractive in a Provincial room, echoing the brass accents of accessories. There are very many attractive small-patterned fabrics on the market for Provincial rooms, in toile de Jouy and other documentaries and in Americana. Large curving cornices padded and covered with fabrics of the same pattern are attractive.

For formal rooms of period style, as Italian Directoire, Empire, Louis XV, or Georgian, draperies may be looped back in a more elaborate manner, and richer smooth-faced fabrics such as pure silks, antique taffetas and damasks may be used, as well as the newly fashionable laces and nets. Windows for these rooms are lavishly covered by lightweight glass curtains topped by contrasting valances which sweep across wide areas, or for narrow windows are made up of crisscrossed asymmetrical fabric lengths. Over-scaled brass or dark mahogany rods with minaret ends give an impressive air to these treatments.

If your family uses the living room for quiet evenings at home, for reading, sewing, and other activities of this nature, avoid patterns and colors that are too gay or lively. If on the other hand, you do much entertaining, and your living room is more formal, you can afford more exaggerated draping styles, and bolder, more dramatic color.

In the bedroom, patterns and colors should be restful. Here, of course, you will want to choose draperies that are most attractive to the member of the family whose room it is. Sturdy .cottons, ranging from sail-cloth and duck to monk's cloth, can be used in children's rooms, and in your son's and daughter's rooms where modern prints will be appreciated. Your teenage daughter may prefer a room which is more of a study and entertaining area, decorated in simple Modern styles with abstract-patterned draperies, to the conventional young girl's frilly room. Your own room may be as soft and inviting and luxurious as your wish can make it, with lustrous rayon satin or taffeta draperies to match quilted flounced spreads and dressing table.


Kitchens, as always, can be curtained informally with sash curtains, Dutch curtains and short, straight- hung curtains of lightweight materials, with gay trimmings. Kitchens are becoming less clinical, and now Provincial small-patterned drapery curtains will go with pine-panelled walls, and candy-striped chintzes, semi-abstract fruit and flower designs, and other bolder patterns and fabrics are used, particularly in a kitchen which has a dining space. 

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

How to Choose Curtains Styles According to Window Architecture

How to Choose Curtains Styles According to Window Architecture
How to Choose Curtains Styles According to Window Architecture
The window architecture itself has much to do in determining treatment. Your window may be an important decorative asset, if it is a picture window, a whole window wall, a bay window, or a corner window; you will want to make the most of it, and yet at the same time not have it stand out so vividly in the room that it is a disquieting factor. The windows must seem a natural part of the room's architecture.

On the other hand you may have two or three windows that by themselves do not seem important architecturally, but that will seem much more important and make your room smoother if you pull them together by your window treatment (that is with a cornice for the group, or a swag or valance tying them together, and by hanging your over draperies as though you were dealing with one window, with a panel at each end).

But also you may have problem windows where, for example, heights vary, or framing styles differ, giving your room an uneven appearance. Or in an older house the architect may have used a definite style, such as a Palladian window, which would give your room a perhaps unwanted classical atmosphere. In such cases it is quite possible to disguise the architecture, and with rods and fabric to transform the dimensions of the window.

The single two-sash window is today, and has always been, the most common type. The sash window may be long and high and narrow, and this may seem to give your room a smaller appearance as it will make the walls seem higher. In this case you will want to make the window seem wider by extending the top frame with blocks of wood and then hanging your draperies and curtains from rods that extend the full width of the extended frame. A deep valance or swag will also cut down the apparent height of your window.

If, on the contrary, the window is wide and low, and seems to make your room too large for its low walls, heighten the frame with a board which you can top with a valance board, and hang your draperies as though they began at this point. Still another way to increase height is to hang your valance board just below ceiling height. A short festoon draped over a pole, combined with filmy, deep-pleated glass curtains, will also give an illusion of height.

In addition to the sash windows are bay windows, which are two or more windows placed at angles to each other. Perhaps the most pleasing and uniformly successful way of treating this window style is to drape it as a single unit and have a continuous valance extend all the way across it. When there is too much wall space between the windows which form the bay, treat each window as a separate unit; but be careful not to have too mucli fabric in this space. Rods can be purchased which curve to conform to the curve of the bay. Another bay-window treatment is to have double sash curtains at each window with a continuous valance of the same material over them all.

Dormer windows, rising from a gable in a slanting roof, may be found in many extension attic-type G.I. houses, and may be treated quite informally. Simple ruffled window curtains of muslin, organdie or some other sheer material are always appropriate. Sash window curtains help a bedroom window under a sloping room to seem larger, particularly if used as glass curtains with ruffled tie-back draperies.

Double-sash windows give one a better chance to exercise imagination and ingenuity. Consider them as one unit, with valances or cornices helping to increase the illusion. The glass curtains may be caught together in an hour-glass shape with a bow at the center, although this treatment is apt to be more distracting and over-elaborate than it is pretty. Or the over draperies can be looped back over Venetian blinds, Japanese blinds, or a wide painted shade. Any number of decorative treatments come to mind.

How to Choose Curtains Styles According to Window Architecture
How to Choose Curtains Styles According to Window Architecture
Corner windows may seem to offer problems, but actually they make very attractive window treatments possible, and give a great feeling of space to the room. Again, they are most successful when no drapery is hung in the corner and they are treated as a single unit (which they actually may be in modern homes and apartments). Blinds with lightweight curtains hung over them to soften the light with draperies at the side are always effective. Another way to tie such windows together is to obtain the feeling of a continuous drapery with festoon valances and long side panels. Or you can outline the entire window with a frame of double ruffles. Corner windows lend themselves to draw draperies.

Casement windows are those windows which swing on hinges at the sides, opening out like doors. They can be single or double, and open in or out It is customary to curtain them with casement cloth, shirred on rods at top and bottom, but you may also wish to provide them with a pair of traverse curtains. A French window, or a door hung as a casement but extending to the floor, may be treated in the same way. Cranes or swinging rods are practical for casement draperies, as are traverse curtains.

It is only since the 1930's that architects have placed great emphasis on using natural ventilation (or heat from the sun's rays ) . Architects then turned the rooms in the house that were most frequently used to the south, and the south wall was in effect one huge window. This idea has become increasingly popular, and today most new homes feature at least one large "picture" window, while windows throughout are larger. In the most advanced modern homes whole sides of the house are virtual sheets o glass.

Actually, a true picture window is a large window with an uninterrupted frame of glass, with no muntins (or crossbars that break the window up into small panes). This is preferable because a view improves when seen through an uninterrupted expanse in which the frame of the window frames the view just as it would a picture. But the term has come to mean any very large window. In both window walls and picture windows the glass may be fixed so that the window never opens, and ventilation comes from slats beneath the window.

Most popular draperies for large windows are the traverse or draw types. These range from fine-count marquisette (44 x 30 threads per square inch) and shimmering glass-fiber yarns to stately floral-print failles and finely-textured satins. Drapery materials should not be too heavy or bulky, so that they may be drawn back and forth easily. Sturdy traverse rods help make these draperies practical. Draw draperies are particularly suited to bedrooms because ventilation, light and privacy are very important in these rooms. In bedrooms it is more necessary that the draperies rather than the glass curtains be of the traverse type.

It stands to reason that if you have a large window you have a good view, and you will not want to obscure it with curtain fabric hung over any portion of the glass. Have your draperies hung at the sides, like portions of the frame, ready to be drawn when you choose. One way of treating a picture window with east or west exposure (where glare is not so great a problem) is to frame the window with a rodless valance on all four sides that is, with shirred and ruffled material attached to parallel rods or one rod, or with a backing of pleated heavier material such as mattress ticking tacked to the frame.


Exposure is important, as glare and light vary, depending on the way the window faces. A southern exposure, which affords heat and maximum light, is favored in modern homes, and glass curtains are important with this exposure as an aid to cutting glare. If your materials are not sun fast, it is wise to line draperies hung at this exposure, as the lining may be renewed thus adding years of service to the fabric. Soft mellow tones may be selected, as the sunlight itself adds brilliancy. For northern exposures warm tones of yellow, orange, and brown are the best choice, especially in bleak northern parts of the country. Light filtering through warm-toned glass curtains may cheer the darkest corners. East light is colder than west light, and warm colors should predominate. 

Monday, December 15, 2014

How to Choose Curtains Styles According to House Architecture

How to Choose Curtains Styles According to House Architecture
How to Choose Curtains Styles According to House Architecture
The architecture of your house will have a lot to do with your decision on window treatment, as you will want to use your draperies and curtains to bring out the best qualities of the architecture from the exterior as well as from the interior, Thus, white ruffled tied-back organdies and other sheer materials are still, perhaps, the most effective curtains for a Cape Cod Colonial house. But today many young couples who really want modern small houses are forced to accept the modified Colonial types, since in most sections of the country small modern houses are not yet within reasonable price brackets. It is possible to give such a home an intriguing modern appearance with, for example, vivid plain fabric draw- draperies across a breezeway, a modern print at the picture window, and so forth. But caution should be used in combining decorating styles as expressed by your curtains, and architectural styles. Certainly it is incongruous to hang looped-back damask draperies in a ranch style house, just as it is inappropriate to have ruffled organdie in an Italian villa.

As far as possible, without making the interior dull, it is a good idea to make the curtains alike in both shape and general style, since it is distracting to see in one facade looped-back, straight-hanging, Dutch style, and various other treatments. If your styles do vary from room to room, however, use glass curtains of the same color throughout the house, and this will help achieve unity on the exterior.

How to Choose Curtains Styles According to House Architecture
How to Choose Curtains Styles According to House Architecture
From the interior, too, the window treatments should have a certain amount of uniformity, especially in those houses where rooms open into one another, or where there is a dining area as part of the general living space, as in many new, small homes. This is especially true of the ranch type house, where all the rooms are on the same floor. It does not mean that you need use the same print throughout, or the same fabric or color, but there should be a correlation of materials and textures, and a blending of colors. If, for example, draperies are featured in the living room, of linen of smoke gray with chartreuse and hunter green leaf patterns in the print and a chartreuse moss fringe, the adjoining dining area can have plain smoke gray linen drapes with chartreuse fringe, or chartreuse draperies with gray fringe, and possibly a valance and tiebacks that repeat the leaf pattern.


Casement cloth, or glass curtains, as mentioned, give the house not only uniformity from the outside, but also on the interior. 

Sunday, December 7, 2014

Deciding What Style of Curtains You Want

Deciding What Style of Curtains You Want
Deciding What Style of Curtains You Want
Deciding what style of curtains you want is not too easy if you want to be sure of having at the same time the most functional and the most attractive draperies or curtains possible. You must answer these questions first:

1) Do you have a pleasant view from your window, one that you want to bring into the room, make a part of the decoration?
2) What style of architecture is your house?
3) What style of architecture is your window?
4) What period or decorative effect is your room, and how much does the furnishing of one room depend on that of another?
5) What exposure does your window have? (This question influences your choice of fabric and color.)

The question of outlook is fundamental. Primarily what one remembers about a window is what it looks out on, not how it is draped. If your room looks out on a beautiful private garden, you can afford to have glass curtains that offer a minimum of privacy, a maximum of bringing nature into the house. If your windows look out of a front yard and a quiet street, lovely in themselves but not too private, you can still have glass curtains which permit a maximum view of the outdoors and yet offer privacy from the person looking in.

Deciding What Style of Curtains You Want
Deciding What Style of Curtains You Want
Suppose, however, that you live in the country where the general effect is pleasant, and yet that ugly house across the street, the new housing development, or the neighbors' children's sandpile spoil the view. Or suppose you live in the city and have a view mainly of ugly roof tops, although you do get an expanse of sky and changing panoramas of sunsets and sunshine! In both these cases you will want a window treatment that offers glimpses of leaves or sky while obscuring details. Marquisette or net glass curtains will do this, as will Japanese bamboo blinds or Venetian blinds.


On the other hand, you may have a distinctly unpleasant view into a dark courtyard, or smack up against a neighbor's garage or house in the suburbs. Then you may as well decide to turn your window wall into an attractively hung and draped expanse. You may want to extend your draw curtains from wall to wall, and have them drawn open at night for ventilation, or you may want opaque glass curtains that let in light and appear pleasantly translucent in the day without giving a view, with the interest created by the over draperies

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Windows from the Inside Looking Out

Windows from the Inside Looking Out
Windows from the Inside Looking Out

Whether you live in a new little G.I. house of Colonial design, a California ranch house, an old Victorian home on a shaded village block, or a city apartment, you are probably more window-conscious than you ever were before. For today, as never before, architects and builders are providing us with houses that furnish more big windows. Across the country, home owners are remodeling their houses to provide for picture windows, corner windows, and other large expanses of glass to allow more sun and light inside, and to bring indoor living in closer contact with the out-of-doors.

If you are lucky enough to have this kind of window area in your house, you are probably concerned with the problem of providing the right curtains and draperies to obtain suitable privacy and still make the most of your windows. You want to frame your windows and make them an exciting part of your room, and yet you want this large space to be a pleasant drapery that you can draw across the window at night. Draperies and curtains on this large scale are expensive to buy ready-made, and hard to find in the right materials, colors and patterns for your room. Making them yourself will prove a satisfying experience.

And because you are more conscious of the more important windows in your home today, you are probably looking around with a new eye at your other windows. Once you have mastered the art of measuring, cutting, sewing and trimming described in this book, you will probably want to start improving all your windows, from the dormers in your expansion attic to the windows in your master bedroom, bringing to all your rooms the softness and pleasing privacy that only draperies afford.

Had this book been written as little as five years ago, there would not have been much to tell you that you couldn't have picked up from your mother or grandmother. But today there are many new things being made to beautify your windows, from glass curtains made of nylon and Fiberglas (mildew resistant, crease resistant, easy to wash and unnecessary to iron) to ready-made valances, complete with fluorescent light for illuminating the draperies and bringing out the beauty of their color or pattern.

In addition, styles in home decorating have changed or perhaps the word is "increased" since today besides the still lovely traditional styles, there is a modern and corresponding emphasis on newer colors and textures. Now decorators tell us that the large areas in a room, the walls, floors, ceilings, and drapes as well, must not be distracting colors should be neutral, and the most successful decorating is that which relies on the accessories and one or two carefully chosen spots in the room for vivid color. While this remains a matter of taste, no matter what period your room is decorated in, you will want to select modern fabrics that are dust-resistant and easily cleaned or laundered, and you will want to achieve enough skill with your sewing machine and scissors to get that clean-cut, authoritative, contemporary look to your creations.

You have probably discovered that a change of draperies adds new life to your house, changing its entire mood and atmosphere. Once you have learned what there is to know about such details as mitered corners and how to cut swags, you will probably want to do creative sewing the best way to style your windows for your room, whether it means a new kind of ruffle trim to match the flounce on your dressing table, or finding a somewhat different and original way to cover a valance board. You will want to change your window styling with the seasons, finding crisp sleek fabrics and treatments with restful, cool colors for summer, and warmer, livelier patterns and color and nubbier fabrics for winter.


And you may want to extend the techniques of window styling to other parts of your house, to curtains for exposed closet spaces, wall-to-wall curtaining for windowless walls that could use a fabric background. 

Sunday, October 19, 2014

How to Select the Height or Length of Curtains

How to Select the Height or Length of Curtains

How to Select the Height or Length of Curtains

You can only find a few plain rules to follow for selecting curtain height or length

The length or height of the hung curtain should be to the floor or the windowsill.
Anything in between looks rather odd.
There is a trend today of puddling curtains, this is where they are made longer than the height required and “puddle” on the floor, this requires a skill in fabric selection, so that they sit well. It is used commonly in living rooms and bedrooms.
With puddled curtains on a hand drawn track, make sure that the width of the curtain is not extreme as they become heavy and difficult to draw back. They are also prone to picking up all the fluff from your floor, so a little bit more attention is required to keeping them looking smart.
The top of the curtain (the heading), for all curtains can be at ceiling height, above or at the top of the window frame or flush with the window reveal.
It all depends on the space that you have. Do keep your choice constant in your home as it can look very odd if some curtain heads are fixed at different heights to others, especially when you can view through from room to room or worse, in the same room.

The finished length of ceiling to floor curtains should leave a 10mm gap, so that they don’t catch the floor and are easy to draw back, the gap for finishing at a windowsill only requires 5mm.
For safety reasons, never cover radiator heaters with curtains, look for another solution, either stop the curtains short of the heaters or use a blind as an alternative style of window treatment.

Consistantancy in design of the window treatments allows for a symmetrical form to be created here in this photograph. The head of the curtains are all the same height and the window swag and tail valance details are all the same and they are all held back at the bottom of the window sill which provides a regular frame for the windows and creates a flow and rhythm to the window treatments.

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Gorgeous Ideas for Bedroom Blinds and Curtains

As we all know blinds are a perfect window treatment for creating privacy in a bedroom, at the same time as still being able to allow some normal light into the room.

Now, let's see some examples here of how they are used on their own or combined with drapery.
Colored roller can blinds used in this bedroom, privacy is only required at night and the curtains are only decorative side curtains.



We use timber venetian blinds here to sort out light during the day and create privacy at night. There are decorative side curtains at the windows, so the timber venetian blinds are the only form of privacy at night.



Now with micro blinds which are used in this bedroom so the look stays light and airy. They are softened by the use of sheers on a casement heading threaded through a decorative rod and held back by a tieback. Once again the blinds are the only form of privacy at night.



A lot of various window treatments in this bedroom. From left to right, louver blind on a small window. Roman blind or shade between the beds and a pinoleum blind at the large window. This is used to filter light and privacy, as the main curtains can be drawn at night.



Attractive combination of blinds and curtains for these palladian windows in the bedroom. The top curve has been left exposed and the blinds attached at the top of the rectangle window. The decorative rod has been attached well above the windows, so that we get to see the detail of the lovely palladian windows.

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Terms and Parts of a Curtain

Terms and Parts of a Curtain

Parts of a Curtain
Parts of a Curtain

Here are Terms of a Curtain:

Now let's get to know the terms and definitions of a curtain. It makes it easier to clarify what you want when you know the right expressions. Get easy with your curtain terms below.

What is "Face Fabric"?

It means the major fabric that faces the interior of the room. It is the “good” side of the fabric.

What is "Return"?

It is the part of the drapery that goes around the side of a cornice, valance, drape to sit flush and at right angles with the wall.

Head / Heading

It is the top of the curtain. It often gets called heading because of the heading tape that is used to make curtain decorative designs, ie French pleat, pencil pleat etc at the head of the curtain.

Stackback

This is the area required and used by pleated curtains when they are open on either side of the window. You need to allow for this when you measure for your curtain track.

Padded Edge

This is a roll of padding along the leading edge of a curtain.

Track or Rod

The track or rod is fixed to the wall above the window and is used to hold up the curtain. 

Hooks

Hooks are what connects the curtain to the tracks or rods.
Parts of a Curtain
Parts of a Curtain

Heading Tape

Curtain heading tape is how you can get interesting head designs like French pleats, pencil pleats, or the basic gathered pleats. You sew on the tape and pull through the strings to create the style or design. 

Leading Edge

This is the inner vertical edges of the curtain that meets its pair at the centre of the window, the edge that is not fixed to the end of the track when you draw back curtains and is often decorated with a contrasting lipping, braid, tasselled fringe.

Hem

The base of the curtain which has the fabric turned back up the curtain to make a neat finish to the bottom edge. It also adds natural weight which helps the curtain hang neatly. Weights can also be added into the hem to help achieve this.

Lining

Lining sits behind the curtain fabric at the window and is what helps with insulation, protects the curtain from moisture and dirt from the window, helps provide fullness in the curtain, blocks out more light and protects the fabric from UV.

Monday, July 7, 2014

The Main Types of Blinds for your Home

The Main Types of Blinds for your Home

The Main Types of Blinds for your Home

Roller Blind

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
Roller blinds have been popular since the 18th Century. A roller blind is basically a stiff fabric wound onto a (usually) wooden roller, which incorporates a spring mechanism so that the blind can be raised or lowered to any position then released to recoil to its top rolled up state. It has a firm lath at the bottom to keep it straight, and the base is often decorated with frills, braid, fringing and accessories.  They can be made of waterproof substances for bathrooms and kitchens and most are sponge cleanable, typically made of fabric or vinyl.
Roller blinds provide a very neat and tidy look and can be used on their own or have curtains over them.  They can be made to measure or you can purchase a do it yourself kit.  They are one of the most unobtrusive forms of window treatments as they take up a minimal space and cover only what is necessary when they are down.

Conventional-blinds roll from the back exposing the roller at the front, reverse-roll blinds roll from the front with the roller behind, and just to be different, bottom up blinds can be fixed to the windowsill and pulled upwards.

Roman Blind / Shade

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
Are usually made of curtain fabric, but they can also be made from sheer fabric. They draw up from the bottom in a series of soft folds to look like a pelmet effect. This is done by cords threaded through rings at the back with dowels threaded through horizontally.

They are flat when they are down. They are usually lined as they sit better. They use less fabric than curtains, but are more detailed to make.
They can be installed inside the window frame or above the window frame to cover the joinery. They have a classic, elegant sophisticated look and suit living and dining rooms, and interiors that have simple lines and are not fussy.
Be careful when selecting large patterned fabrics, as when folded up they can give a distorted look.
A variation of this blind is the softfold or hobbled roman blind. This is when the blind stays in soft folds when it is fully extended.

Austrian Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds

Austrian Blinds are like Roman, as they move up and down with cords and rings, but they have a gathered heading and use a vertical shirring which transforms the folds into soft scallops.

Balloon and Cloud Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
It is raised and lowered by cords threaded through rings at the back. When raised these billow into scallops along the bottom edge of the blind, a balloon blind has inverted pleats at wide spacings from top to bottom and a cloud blind has a gathered heading.
Tailed blinds happen when the cords and rings are not installed to the side edges, therefore the bottom corners hang down below the scallops.

Wooden Slat Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
Similar to Pinoleum but they are coarse and heavier.

Quill Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
Similar to Pinoleum but made from white plastic quill.

Cane Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
These are made from whole or split bamboo, they are good for use in conservatories, and they can roll or pleat up. They do not completely block the sunlight or vision.

Festoon Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
These are similar to an Austrian Blind but they have additional ruching, which means it keeps its gathered effect even when it is down. They have a narrow heading tape at the top and vertically which creates the gathers.

Honeycomb Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
The side view looks like a stack of honeycombs. It is a cellular insulating blind and has numerous brand names.
It is a very efficient blind with great insulating properties and when pulled up, takes up only a small amount of room and is not intrusive on the window.

Venetian Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
They are horizontal blinds which have 2 inch wide slats held together with 1 inch wide cotton tape. They were the original horizontal blind and are heavy and difficult to clean. They are very useful for blocking out sunlight, for heat gain reduction or redirecting the light. They are not in common use today, but are having resurgence with the “Retro” look.

Vertical Louver Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
Fixed at top with a track and sometimes bottom, they are made of thin strips of canvas, wooden slats and silk or synthetic fabric. They pivot open or closed and can be drawn across to the sides of the window. They are often used in floor to ceiling windows. They suit contemporary settings and large picture windows.

Paper Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
These are made from a tough stiff permanently pleated paper or fibre. They are available in a wide range of colours. They are an inexpensive practical and decorative product that is easy to dust. They can be combined with curtains.

Balastores

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
They are an inexpensive blind made from strong treated paper or fibre, which is accordion pleated with holes punched out all over it. They allow plenty of light to filter through and restrict glare.

Pleatex Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
They are made from tough super calendered wet strength craft paper with permanent pleats. They are cheaper than roller blinds.

Mini Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
They are an updated version of venetians; their vinyl slat width is smaller. They are available in almost any color vinyl as well as metallics and perforated metal, and color coordinated cord and rod operational gear. They can be pulled up to reveal almost all the window, so they are useful if you require an unobstructed view.  Mini Blinds were originally designed for commercial use, they have a slim architectural look and they suit contemporary interiors and are in frequent use. They are difficult to clean, and are noisy with an open window.  They are good insulators in winter and are very useful for covering large windows. They can be purchased in modular sizes and colors or custom made to suit. They can be used on doors and sloping windows.

Micro – Mini Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
They are also known as Slimline blinds, they are the same as mini blinds but have an even smaller width and are finer to look through, being ideal for maintaining a view. They are very delicate and easy to bend and twist which is a downfall.

Cottage Blind

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
A cottage blind is a half-length blind, which blocks a view or creates privacy, usually used in a bathroom. It can be mounted on curtain wire or a curtain rod as they cover the lower half of the window. They are often co-coordinated with a small valance at the top of the window.

Pinoleum Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
Pinoleum blinds are made form matchstick like slats of wood.
They can be stained or left natural. Pinoleum blinds are woven together with cotton. Pinoleum blinds have the same spring mechanism as roller blinds. You can see through them, and they allow a soft light to filter through. They are a very cheap way to cover large expanses of glass. They can be fixed to sloping ceilings.

Timber Venetian Blinds

Types of Blinds
Types of Blinds
These are thicker that standard venetian blinds, they are usually manufactured in cedar, and provide a wonderful mellow glow through the window. Timber venetian blinds are expensive but are well worth the money for the fantastic look. They are more effective as insulators than metal or vinyl blinds.
Timber venetian blinds are a sturdier blind than the venetians.