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Monday, March 2, 2015

How to Add Softness to your Home with Fabrics

How to Add Softness to your Home with Fabrics
How to Add Softness to your Home with Fabrics
Tired of the way your home looks?  Add a fresh, updated appearance to your home with fabric! Sewing for your home can be quick and easy, and you'll have professional results using timesaving methods that require a minimum of sewing skills.  If you don't sew at all, don't give up!  Many items can be created with no-sew techniques.  Guidelines are available for selecting fabrics appropriate for your project . . . whether you’re making the items yourself or having someone makes them for you. Fabric furnishings add softness and a distinctive character to any room.  You’ll discover almost limitless ways to use fabrics in decorating with curtains, draperies, upholstery, bedspreads, dust ruffles and tablecloths.  Fabrics are both attractive and practical on walls and ceilings or when used for room dividers, padded headboards for beds, wall hangings, picture frames, pillows of all kinds and shapes, storage devices and any number of other creative uses.  Look for ideas as you browse through decorating books and magazines or page through pattern books found at fabric stores.  Take time to observe the uses of fabrics in store displays, model homes and even the homes of your friends.  Don't try to copy ideas, however, but adapt them to create your own one-of-a-kind items.
 
Fabric Choices
Shopping for fabrics can be both fun and frustrating because there’s an unlimited variety of fabric colors, textures and designs available. Consider trying an idea used by professional designers by selecting a fabric in a pattern and colors that you like as the basis for a room’s color scheme.  More companies are now offering coordinating fabrics that make designing your room a real delight.  Wide fabric widths of 54", 60", 90" and even 120" mean less piecing and also reduce both cost and sewing time.  Bed sheets provide another source for wide widths of fabric in the latest colors and patterns.

Select fabrics that are appropriate for the intended use and desired method of care.  They should also look well with the other furnishings in the room.  Study design trends for current colors and patterns and be alert to new ideas that are starting to appear in stores and magazines. Then use these new colors and patterns to give your present furnishings an updated look.

How to Add Softness to your Home with Fabrics
How to Add Softness to your Home with Fabrics
Purchasing Pointers
As you are planning your project and selecting the fabric, consider the following guidelines:

* Know your budget limitations before you go out to buy. Having a price range established help to eliminate some choices immediately.

* Take time to plan your project carefully.  What colors are used in the room?  How will one pattern complement or blend with another?  What will this item add to the decor of the room?

* Measure carefully and write down these dimensions to take with you when shopping.  Also include a tape measure, pad, pencil, paint chips, fabric and carpet samples, so you'll be prepared for comparing colors and purchasing items that you need for the project.

* Be careful with color!  If you are considering either a bright or a dark color, will it be placed where direct sunlight will hit it?  Some dark colors fade very quickly, and bright, intense colors will stand out as new when combined with older furnishings in a room.  In situations such as this, choose more subdued or grayed colors.  And remember that colors change dramatically when viewed under different lighting or with different color combinations.  Play it safe by asking if a large sample is available to be taken out and viewed in the intended setting.  When samples are not available, purchase a yard to try out in your home in both daylight and night lighting.

* Examine the fabric construction before buying.  Remember that  fiber content, type of yarn, fabric construction and finishing techniques all play a part in determining the serviceability of the fabric.  As a rule, the tighter the yarns are twisted, the longer the wear you can reasonably expect.  The tighter the weave or higher the thread count (number of threads per inch), the stronger the fabric. It pays to use good quality fabrics for most decorating projects. The items last longer and give a finer finished look.  Consider, too, the  length of time you expect to use these items. You'll need a better quality fabric for draperies that you expect to last 10 to 15 years than you will for a pair of kitchen curtains that you plan to replace in two or three years.  Don't hesitate to ask your County Extension agent for help or guidance.

* Carefully evaluate the appropriateness of the fabric, color, pattern and texture, keeping the intended use in mind.   Is the fabric sturdy enough for the intended use?  Is it soft enough to drape if you want it to drape or crisp enough to hold a desired shape?

* Ask for and read carefully any labels and hang tags that are attached to, printed on or come with the fabric.  These are important guides in knowing how to care for your finished items.  If using a washable fabric, plan to pre-shrink it along with other materials, such as buckram or linings. Do not wash a fabric if dry cleaning is recommended.  Vacuum these items regularly to prevent dust from accumulating on the fabric surface.  It is recommended that fabrics be thoroughly vacuumed, dry cleaned or laundered after the pollen season for health reasons, especially if someone in your household has allergies.  Electronic air cleaners or regular cleaning/changing of the filter on forced-air furnaces will help to protect fabrics from dust.  Dust may also be removed by tumbling fabric items, such as drapery panels, in the clothes dryer without heat.

* Consider the size of a design when selecting fabric for your project.  Random patterns, small all over prints and stripes are easier to work with than large, strongly defined repeat patterns. Figuring the extra yardage that is needed for matching a repeat can become quite involved and add to the total cost of the project.  If you fall in love with a large or dominant pattern, be sure to purchase enough additional fabric to match patterns and complete the project.

* If a vertical line is important, such as for window curtains, be sure that any pattern is on-grain. Don't buy fabric that is printed off-grain or that has been pulled off-grain during finishing or wrapping on the bolt.  Examine the fabric carefully, and ask the sales clerk for help in determining if the fabric is grain perfect.

* If you are covering furniture or pillows, will the fabric require a lining to prevent showing through?  Most window coverings will be more durable and save energy if they are lined.

* Has the fabric been treated with a stain-repellant finish?  These finishes help in maintaining the appearance over a period of time.  To test the effectiveness of a stain resistant finish, drop a small amount of water on a fabric sample.  If the water beads up instead of soaking in, the fabric will repel stains.  After laundering or dry cleaning, this protective finish may need to be reapplied either by the dry cleaner or with a spray that can be purchased at retail stores.  However, read hang tags and warranties carefully for any precautions regarding recommended care and application of additional finishes.

* Buy all the fabric you need at one time and make a note of the dye lot number if available.  Dye lots differ, and what started as a raspberry color may turn brighter red in a later shipment. If a fabric continues to be available over a period of time and you decide to add more furnishings in the same or a coordinating fabric, be sure to check colors carefully before purchasing.

* Textile products and fabric furnishings are expected to be serviceable.  Ask yourself which of the following characteristics are most important--durability, comfort, care, appearance, fashion or price.  Use these rankings as guidelines when making your final selections.     

* Remember . . . haste makes waste.  Take time to think each project through carefully.  Allow time, too, to consider creative ways of finishing your project.  A little extra time and some imagination can turn the ordinary into the unusual and distinctive.
 
* Enjoy the creative process you are experiencing.  Then appreciate the praise and satisfaction you’ll receive for a job well done!

How to Add Softness to your Home with Fabrics
How to Add Softness to your Home with Fabrics
Figuring Fabric Amounts
Determining the amount of fabric that is needed for a project can be confusing.  However, it's not really difficult!  Purchased patterns and project instructions give instructions for yardage and suggested pattern placement for cutting pieces.  You can also make your own "layouts" just like those in pattern instructions to make best use of fabric if using odd shapes and sizes. To do this, use graph paper to draw rectangles to scale to represent widths of 45", 54" and 60" (or 90" and 120" widths if you know that you will be shopping for these wider fabrics).  Make a number of copies to use as "master" forms.

For each project, refer to the measurements you have taken and sketch out the pieces you'll need (fronts, backs, sides) on your master.  These sketches will tell you how many yards are needed for the width of fabric you are considering.  If piecing is necessary, you will also be able to determine how many "lengths" of fabric will be required to complete the project.  (Before you actually purchase fabric, remember to consider any additional allowances that may be needed for ½ inch seams, hems, directional patterns, fabric nap, design repeats and loft from batting or filler.)

Joining Lengths of Fabrics
When figuring the amount of yardage needed, remember that the primary rule for positioning seams is to make them as inconspicuous as possible. That usually means that seams will be placed on the side, rather than down the center of tablecloths and bedspreads.

Use selvage edges when possible for sewing lengths of fabric together.  Be sure to add ½ inch seam allowances to each piece for seams.

How to Add Softness to your Home with Fabrics
How to Add Softness to your Home with Fabrics
Matching Patterns
Any design repeat must be measured and figured carefully when purchasing fabrics.  Small prints may not be that noticeable, but larger prints can be as much as twenty or thirty inches in length for one repeat.  Measure the repeat on the fabric you are considering and add to the required yardage of each length to be pieced.  (For instance, there should be a full design repeat positioned along the top of each panel on fabric-covered walls or along the top of each curtain and drapery panel.)

One-Way Designs
If arranging pieces on a one-way design or napped fabric, such as velvet or corduroy, be sure that all pieces are placed in the correct (same) direction.  Check to be sure that patterns are matched when necessary and that large motifs are centered on cushions and tablecloths.

Also, check the design repeat across the width of the fabric to be sure that you will have enough fabric to complete your project as you would like for it to be finished.

Trims

Fringe, tassels, braid, cording, lace, ribbons and bows add distinction and character to otherwise plain items.  Consider the decorating style in the room as well as the weight and recommended care of fabric when you are selecting trims.  When planning the placement of trimmings, mark guidelines with either a water-soluble marking pen or a marker using ink that disappears. A glue stick will hold the trim in place while stitching.  Some trims can be attached with fusible fabric or glue.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

How to Choose Curtain Patterns

How to Choose Curtain Patterns
How to Choose Curtain Patterns
Today a call for of a curtain is such a trend. Indeed, when a homeowner need privacy for their house or room but still want to get the style and beautiful, they can use a curtain for covering the windows. But sometimes, they don’t get the meaning except privacy. It means that a curtain has another meaning except privacy such a beauty, elegance, glamour, and more. Then how to choose the curtain pattern?

How to Choose Curtain Patterns
First of choosing the curtain pattern is texture. To select the texture of fabric curtains, consider the atmosphere of the room to be created. In the formal room, you can choose the material of silk or velvet. Other fabric choices that can be more easily washable rayon fabric are a mix of fine and cotton sateen. As for the rooms that are relaxed, you can choose a bloated linen or velvet fabric wrinkled. Cotton cloth can also be easily coordinated with any room concept because such a neat texture of wool fabric.

How to Choose Curtain Patterns
Second, in choosing the curtain pattern is color. Color selection is based on whether the blackout curtains design will be incorporated with the design of the room to sweeten zoom. If so, choose colors that match the color of the curtain walls but darker, could also replace it with a neutral color. Meanwhile, the use of bold colors is going to make curtains stand out. Keep in mind, the rooms are much exposed to sunlight, the color of the curtains with stripes will further beautify the look of the room.


How to Choose Curtain Patterns
Third of choosing the curtain pattern is the style. Interior design rules, generally if the furniture of the room already has a motif, let the curtain pattern image appear innocent. Vice versa, if the furniture without motive, then choose curtains with interesting motif. Common motif that many people enjoy and look stylish is small motifs and neutral, for example, is a point and a line. Motifs like this; it would seem to have a wonderful texture when viewed from a distance. Select motif curtains that are still associated with the concept of space in order to look harmonious.

How to Choose Curtain Patterns

How to Choose Curtain Patterns





Monday, February 23, 2015

Tailoring for Professional Looking Curtains and Draperies

Tailoring for Professional Looking Curtains and Draperies
Tailoring for Professional Looking Curtains and Draperies
JLF there is any one single key to turning out tailored, professional looking curtains and draperies, it is measuring accurately before you start. Count on having enough material to avoid a skimpy result, so that you won't be haunted as you go along by that nervous feeling that you're not going to have enough material to provide full hems and ample trim. Remember particularly that if you use a hard-to-match color or an exclusive print, your fabric supplier may not have any more material in stock when you discover that you've underestimated your needs; and to avoid needless delays once you've begun, be sure you have sufficient yardage. You can always use material you have left over for pillow flounces, slipcover trim, valances, tiebacks, and so forth. On the other hand, when measuring don't be too lavish, or you may end up with too much material in your draperies or curtains with that clumsy, home-made look. As with every other art from cooking to painting the trick is to strike a happy balance.

Use a steel tape or yardstick for measuring your windows. A dressmaker's measuring tape will not assure an accurate measurement. But when you come to measuring your material, a yardstick or steel tape may stretch your fabric, so use your cloth tape. Lay the tape measure right on the material so that it will be in line with the edge you are measuring.

Tailoring for Professional Looking Curtains and Draperies
Tailoring for Professional Looking Curtains and Draperies
It goes without saying that you've made your decision as to what type of draperies you plan to have before you purchase your fabric. And before you shop for materials you want to have your measurements very firmly in mind. In fact, you will benefit from keeping a little notebook for measurements window measurements, size of valance, cornice, or swag you'll want to make, and how much material you'll need for the glass curtains, the draperies, the valance, the lining, etc. You can also enter in this book comparative prices on fabrics and hardware. Before you shop then, you will have measured the window and approximated the length and width of curtains and draperies, and in addition the allowance you will want to make for casings, headings, shrinkage, hems, and other details.

Tailoring for Professional Looking Curtains and Draperies
Tailoring for Professional Looking Curtains and Draperies
The first step in measuring is to measure each window in a room. Sometimes even windows right next to one another are of different heights, especially in older apartments and often even in new homes where some structural detail may have caused the builder to place the windows at different levels. You may find as great a variation as two inches, and since one advantage in having draperies is that they can conceal structural unevenness in a room, you will want to know whether you have such a problem.


Measurements you will need for each window are 1) the width from trim to trim; 2) the length from top window sash to sill; 3) the length from top window sash to just below the apron; 4) the length from top window sash to floor; 5) the length from above the window frame to floor; and 6) for draperies, the width from outside the window frame to baseboard or floor. Measurements will depend on what type of window treatment you plan. On the whole, it is possible to generalize that glass curtains generally require measurements for within the window frame, whereas draperies, which are hung from above the window, also extend below it. 

Monday, February 9, 2015

Fabulous Synthetic Curtains and Drapery Fabrics

Fabulous Synthetic Curtains and Drapery Fabrics

Fabulous Synthetic Curtains and Drapery Fabrics
Fabulous Synthetic Curtains and Drapery Fabrics
Increasingly you will find fabulous synthetic curtains and drapery fabrics in the stores. Whether it is a "concealed" plastic that is, a plastic you would never dream was plastic unless you were told, such as a velvet pile of nylon or a filmy lace or whether it is a fabric more easily recognized as synthetic, such as rubber-like shower curtain material or plastic film, there are certain advantages you should appreciate and certain things you should know about these test-tube materials. First of all, not all plastics have the same properties; try to get a brand name plastic or synthetic that is labeled and tells what it will do. Follow directions for laundering, cleaning and care. Inquire as to the fiber blend if the material is not a pure plastic.

In sewing plastic film materials, handle them lightly. Try not to baste, tack or pin, as you won't be able to repair the holes made. Use Scotch tape instead for preliminary marking, or try paper clips or weights. Don't press or crease your plastic fabric, either. Plastics of this type are easily stitched. Use a fine needle and a mercerized thread, or if sewing a nylon or other plastic fiber fabric, use nylon thread. These threads are said to possess the pliability of cotton, with the strength and elasticity of nylon.

Newest of the synthetics is orlon, a synthetic fiber which is said to be virtually indestructible by the elements that is, by sun, light and heat. Orion can be hung at windows that get strong sunlight or over radiators without fear that this will ultimately weaken them. While nylon has what is called "static electricity" and has a tendency to stick to the windows, orlon is not affected in this way. Orion is little sheerer than nylon, with a trifle more body, and because of this you can get a good drape with it.

Nylon today is being produced in a wide range of traditional weaves and in many beautiful colors; in its sheer and marquisette forms it leads the other synthetics in sheerness and softness and in the delicacy of its colors. Nylon marquisette is the most practical of the nylon fabrics, taking the place of conventional sheer cottons and rayons, but bringing a new laundering ease. Nylon ninon, more opaque than the marquisettes, is a favorite for draperies, glass curtains used without draperies, and for wall-to-wall draw curtains. Nylon lace retains its shape after washing and need not be stretched. Lighter and sheerer than lace woven of conventional cottons, it has an almost silvery sheen. Other glass curtain possibilities of nylon include a new tricot novelty weave, white on white Jacquards, satin weaves, sheer plain weaves embroidered in white with little flowers, very sheer novelty striped taffetas, and faille. There is also a closely- woven voile.

Fabulous Synthetic Curtains and Drapery Fabrics
Fabulous Synthetic Curtains and Drapery Fabrics
Deterioration is not a serious factor with plastic fibers of a glossy type, and strong sunlight affects nylon, for example, less than taffeta and silk. But dull yarns are more quickly harmed by exposure to sunlight, and nylon velvets and other pile fabrics should not be hung at windows that get long exposure to sun.

Fiberglas is heavier than nylon or orlon, but because it is spun from actual marbles of limpid glass, it has a quality of translucence and a delightful shimmering quality. It is available in many pastel shades, and makes an effective wall-to-wall drapery.

You can put draperies of plastic or fiberglass away for winter or summer without fearing mildew. Plastic and glass fabrics are easy to keep clean because they shed dirt and dust. If the dyes and finishes are color- fast, then washing presents no problem, and since the fibers are smooth and don't hold water, the fabrics dry quickly. The spun nylons, cut into soft, fuzzy yarns, dry more slowly.

As you can see the subject of fabrics is a vast one, with many variations and possibilities offered the discriminating. It is foolhardy to make rules about which fabrics go with which styles of decorating, as contemporary decoration increasingly adopts materials associated with periods and schools of design no longer fashionable, and brings them up to date with modern colors and methods of manufacture. Thus brocades, taffetas, matelass6s (which are made of soft double compound fabrics with a quilted appearance) are in high style once more as decorative fashion takes its cue from far-away places or the past.

Fabulous Synthetic Curtains and Drapery Fabrics
Fabulous Synthetic Curtains and Drapery Fabrics
Today, for example, there is new interest in documentary fabrics. Documentaries are not merely the small, repetitive patterns of calico for use in French Provincial or Early American rooms, that many people think them to be. They are rather those fabric designs that were worked out long ago by craftsmen as, for example, a French artist in Paris during the time of
Louis XVI, or by a pioneer farm woman in the days of the settling of our own country. Those from abroad may have found their way into American hands with our clipper ships or Nantucket whalers, wrapped around some jewel or ornament a sailor was bringing home. They are, in other words, documents of the past, and in color and pattern they bring back the flavor of other days and ways of life, and so they include not only the small-scale cretonnes but the large-scale chintzes, elegant damasks and brocades. If you have a period room, the good documentary fabrics will complement the mahogany, fruitwood, walnut, maple, pine or whatever wood you have that was used by cabinetmakers of the period you have adopted.

On the whole, however, for modern rooms, we might sum up by stating that nylon, fiber glass, marquisette and ninon nets, gauze, taffeta, satin, raw silks, moires, denims and sailcloths, monk's cloth and homespun, are good. Metallic accents are used.

For French Provincial in the country, use homespun colors, calicos and cottons, toile de Jouy and documentaries. For city French Provincial use, silks and deeper colors, more decisive patterns should be employed.

For Early American use small quiet chintzes, calicos, ginghams and other cottons of this type, hand-blocked linens and cretonnes. For Victorian consider lace, the pile fabrics and brocades.

Queen Anne, Chippendale, Hepplewhite, Sheraton and other 18th century styles can associate well with richer satins, silk brocades, damask, moire, and chintz although Queen Anne is more simple than Chippendale.


General principles when selecting a fabric are: When you shop for fabrics ask what special qualities the fabric has, whether it should be washed or cleaned, and how to care for it. If it is labeled, read the label before buying it. 

Saturday, January 31, 2015

How to Sew and Make New Curtains

How to Sew and Make New Curtains

Here is a good lesson to learn an indoor DIY project: how to make new curtains. The carrying out is not difficult; if you can sew a straight line with a machine, you can make new curtains to slide over your windows. The challenge is in the planning.

Fabric
A medium-weight drapery fabric is a good choice; it is often wider than dress material.  Avoid large designs. They can be overwhelming in a small space, and you will need extra fabric to allow matching. Avoid dark colors, too, as they are prone to fading. Your curtains will last longer and offer more privacy if they are lined. Laminated fabric is hard to find, but drapery lining is widely available and can be sewn to your curtain fabric. Look for a medium weight lining that provides some sun and thermal protection. You also need a roll of "stay tape" (to stabilize the stretchy diagonal edges of the corner curtains), about 12” of sticky-back white fuzzy (loop) Velcro, and 12” of sew-on hook-side Velcro. These items are available from fabric stores.

Hardware

For curtains that slide on a track, you need to purchase "glide tape" (which is sewn to the curtain) and "white wall track" (which is screwed to the wall). The standard tape package contains 72" of tape, and the track comes in lengths that vary around 45", depending on vendor. These supplies are not expensive, but since you have to pay shipping, be sure to order enough the first time. If you already have the sliding track system, order new tape. The plastic buttons become brittle with age and it's time-consuming to remove old tape. At most hardware stores, you can buy finishing washers for tiebacks) and decorative screw caps. Screws should be fully threaded, with no smooth shank, and stainless steel is best. Use an awl or ice for putting holes in the fabric and Velcro, and for starting screw holes in the wall.

Measuring
 Length: The finished curtains on the A walls should all hang to the same distance above the hinge.  Allow enough coverage at the top of the window for the wall track. Width: In order for the curtain panel to clip into the end of the wall track, and cover the hardware, the side edges of the curtain should extend 1" beyond a glide-tape button.

Hold the glide tape above the window to determine this minimum width. The measurement will be wider than the actual window. Measure all the windows, including the door. Add at least 2" to each width dimension to allow for seams. Curtains should always be cut lengthwise on the raw fabric, matching the fabric design, or they won't hang properly.

Corner curtains require special attention, noted here in italics. If your fabric has a printed pattern, you cannot create matching triangles by cutting a square in half – if you do, one triangle will be upside down! Matching triangles on a single wall must be cut as vertical, mirror-image twins.

NOTE: If your corner windows are the usual 21” high, and you want your finished curtain to have two equal legs of about 32”, those raw cut edges must be at least 33 ¾”, NOT 33”, or you have no seam allowance for the diagonal. The surest method is to make a paper pattern for your corner, pin it to the fabric, and cut ½” from the edges all the way around.

Knowing the width of your fabric, figure how many yards you will need for your project. Make a similar calculation for the lining, which may be manufactured in a different width. To confirm your calculations, sketch your layout on graph paper. You will also need fabric to make tie-backs for your curtains. These 4” strips can be cut horizontally. Remember to allow extra fabric for all seams and hems.

How to Sew and Make New Curtains
How to Sew and Make New Curtains
Construction:  The easiest way to line your curtains is to cut mirror-image pieces of fabric and lining, adding ½” seam allowance all the way around. Pin the right sides together and stitch ½” from the edge all around, leaving about 6” unstitched. Trim excess material from the corners and turn the piece inside out through the unstitched pocket. Use the scissor points to gently poke the corners into shape. Press the edges carefully, fingering the unstitched pocket into place. Top stitch around the entire panel, including the unstitched pocket, about ¼” from the edge. Press again. Place the glide tape along the top of the back of the curtain panel, with the end glide buttons about 1" inside each side. Stitch the top of the glide tape to the back of the top of the curtain panel, sewing along the top stitching. Use a zipper foot on the machine so that you can sew close to the glide buttons.

Finally, stitch the bottom edge of the glide tape in place. If you are using glide tape on both top and bottom of a curtain, as you would for the roof bubbles, make certain that the upper and lower buttons are directly opposite each other so that the open curtain pleats evenly.  Add a piece of sew-on Velcro to the back of any curtain hem or corner that you want held against the wall.

The panels for the corner windows are right-angle triangles. While construction is basically the same as for the rectangular curtains, the stretchy diagonal edges need special care. When you pin the lining for sewing, include a strip of Stay Tape along the diagonal sewing line and stitch it into the seam. The narrowest (bottom) point of the triangle will be thick and needs careful trimming to remove extra bulk before it’s turned inside-out. The large curtain next to the door may have one triangular side. This area can be cut separately, then sewed to the rectangle as part of the whole curtain.

Tiebacks:  Cut tieback strips 4” wide and 1" longer than the finished length. Fold the strip in half lengthwise, right sides together, and stitch ¼” from the long edge. Press the seam open and turn the strip inside-out. Center the seam and press again, turning ½” of the raw ends inside. Top stitch all the way around, ¼” from the edge. Sew a square of loop-side Velcro to one end, over the long seam. 

Mounting

Glide Track:  The plastic track can be cut to length with utility shears. If in doubt, cut it long and shorten it as needed. Mark the screw holes by holding the track, with curtain attached, at the desired location. Put a screw near each end of the track.

Fixed corner triangles:  Use masking tape to hold the curtain in place. Through the diagonal curtain edge, screw 4 small pan-head screws in decorative covers.

Tiebacks:  Through the non-Velcro end of each tieback, seam-side up, screw a short pan-head screw and finishing washer, hiding the screw behind the curtain.

Velcro:  After the curtains and tiebacks are in place, press the fuzzy side of sticky-back Velcro to each piece of sewn-on loop Velcro. Stick it against the wall where desired, pull away the curtain, and screw each sticky-back Velcro in place with a short, small flat-headed screw.

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Ideas for DIY Canopy Bed Frame and Curtains

Ideas for DIY Canopy Bed Frame and Curtains


Here are inspiring canopy bed frame designs and pictures for you to choose from. You will see: bed curtains canopy rods bedroom, romantic canopy beds decoration, your private room with bed canopy ideas, bedroom luxury canopy bed curtains ideas with white curtain, DIY canopy bed with white curtain and lighting.